Most recent update: Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 11:56

Bariatric News - Cookies & privacy policy

You are here

Opinion & blogs

Bariatric News welcomes contributions from our readers. If you have a topic you'd like to talk about, or something you'd like to get off your chest, please get in touch.
09:27 08/12/15 | Owen Haskins | Editor in chief, Bariatric News

Just in case you missed any news in November 2015, these were the 10 most read articles on bariatricnews.net including the latest research, product & industry news, policy news and more...

sLR11 protein prevents body losing weight

An international team of researchers from the Wellcome Trust-Medical Research Council Institute of Metabolic Sciences at the University of Cambridge, UK, and Toho University, Japan, have shown that a protein found in the body, known as sLR11, inhibits our ability to burn fat. Most of the fat cells in the body act to store excess energy and release it when needed but some types of fat cells, known as brown adipocytes, function primarily for a process known as thermogenesis, which generates heat to keep us warm. However, the fatter we are, the more our body appears to produces sLR11. The study, ‘Soluble LR11/SorLA represses thermogenesis in adipose tissue and correlates with BMI in humans’, published in the journal Nature Communications, may have implications for the treatment of obesity and other metabolic diseases...(more)

Alternative method preventing Petersen post-RYGB

Researchers from Brazil have proposed an alternative to closing the Petersen space and thereby preventing internal Petersen hernia in postoperative Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) patients. In their paper, ‘Fixing jejunal maneuver to prevent Petersen hernia in gastric bypass, published in the journal, Arquivos Brasileiros de Cirurgia Digestiva, they conclude that in their experience in 52 patients, fixing the first part of the jejunum on left side of the transverse mesocolon was safe, effective and prevented internal hernia in Petersen space in RYGB patients in the short and medium term...(more)

Thickness calibration device would avoid leaks in LSG

A thickness calibration device is required in order to determine correct staple height and avoid leaks when performing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), according a paper ‘A Thickness Calibration Device Is Needed to Determine Staple Height and Avoid Leaks in Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy’, published in Obesity Surgery, Drs Rose Huang (Boehringer Laboratories, Phoenixville, PA, USA) and Professor Michel Gagner (Hospital Du Sacre Coeur, Montreal, QC, Canada)...(more)

(More)
05:27 09/11/15 | Owen Haskins | Editor in chief, Bariatric News

Just in case you missed any news in October 2015, these were the 10 most read articles on bariatricnews.net including the latest research, product & industry news, policy news and more...

Surgery is highly effective in reducing obesity in Hispanics

Bariatric surgery markedly reduces excess weight and BMI in Hispanics, according to the findings of a study presented by investigators from Montefiore Health System at the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Clinical Congress 2015. Although bariatric surgery has been established as the most effective long-term treatment for morbid obesity and obesity-related comorbidities, including diabetes, kidney dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, racial disparities exist that preclude Hispanic patients from being considered for or undergoing bariatric surgery...(more)

A new organisation – The MGB/OAGB Club

At the recent IFSO World Congress in Vienna, a new organisation was created - the MGB/OAGB Club - with the aim of disseminating information about this rapid and generally safe procedure...(more)

Study finds obesity paradox is a product of biases

Demographers Samuel Preston of the University of Pennsylvania and Andrew Stokes of Boston University have found that studies reporting that obese or overweight people with cardiovascular disease are outliving their normal weight counterparts – the so-called obesity paradox – are a product of biases involving reverse causation and confounding by smoking. According to their research, ‘Smoking and reverse causation create an obesity paradox in cardiovascular disease’, published in the journal Obesity, when accounting for weight history in addition to weight at the time of survey and when adding in smoking as a factor, obesity is harmful, not helpful, to someone with cardiovascular disease...(more)

Risk of self-harm increases after bariatric surgery

(More)
07:48 06/10/15 | Owen Haskins | Editor in chief, Bariatric News

Just in case you missed any news in September 2015, these were the 10 most read articles on bariatricnews.net including the latest research, product & industry news, policy news and more...

Surgery beats standard therapy after 5 years for T2DM

Metabolic or bariatric surgery may be more effective than standard medical treatments for the long-term control of type 2 diabetes in obese patients, according to a study by King's College London and the Universita Cattolica in Rome, Italy. The study, ‘Bariatric–metabolic surgery versus conventional medical treatment in obese patients with type 2 diabetes: 5 year follow-up of an open-label, single-centre, randomised controlled trial’, published in the Lancet, is the first to provide data on five-year outcomes of surgery from a randomised clinical trial specifically designed to compare this new approach against standard medical therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes...(more)

ADA/AHA statement includes recommendations for surgery

The American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association have released a revised joint scientific statement outlining best practices to reduce cardiovascular risk in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), published in both Diabetes Care and Circulation. The statement, ‘Update on Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Light of Recent Evidence: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association.’, includes recommendations on surgical options for weight loss...(more

Stretta tops the bill in review of GERD treatments

(More)
07:41 07/09/15 | Owen Haskins | Editor in chief, Bariatric News

Just in case you missed any news in August 2015, these were the 10 most read articles on bariatricnews.net including the latest research, product & industry news, policy news and more...

Long-term follow-up shows decrease in T2DM remission

Long-term follow-up of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy results in a decrease in remission rates of diabetes and, to a lesser extent, other obesity-related disorders over time, according to a study published online by JAMA Surgery. The weight loss from surgery and major improvements in comorbidities were not correlated to the percentage of excess weight loss...(more)

Review finds MGB is safe and effective

Laparoscopic mini gastric bypass (LMGB) is at least not inferior to laparoscopic gastric bypass (LRYGB), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in terms of weight loss and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) remission and has few complications. These are the conclusions from a met-analysis by researchers from Fudan University Pudong Medical Center, Shanghai, China, who state that future clinical trials are still needed to demonstrate its utility and establish the guidelines for LMGB...(more)

Bariatric surgery benefits gut microbiome for a decade

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and vertical banded gastroplasty result in similar microbiome remodelling changes that are maintained almost a decade later in a group of women, according to a study published in Cell Metabolism. The outcomes show that microbiome changes are specific to the surgery and not just a reflection of altered weight changes (BMI), which paves the way for the exploration of probiotics as an alternative to weight-loss surgery...(more)

Report on the Mini-Gastric Bypass Conclave Meeting

(More)

Pages