Metabolic surgery in patients with hypertension decreases the risk of MACEs

Metabolic surgery benefits people with morbid obesity and hypertension reducing their risk of major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE), according to a study, ‘Association between metabolic surgery and cardiovascular outcome in patients with hypertension: A nationwide matched cohort study’, published in PLoS Med.

The emerging obesity paradox - cardiovascular risk of HIV

Researchers at the Medical College of Georgia scientists are investigating an emerging obesity paradox that a new generation of HIV drugs appear to cause weight gain, which appears to limit, rather than increase patients' already significant risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Although these newer generation of HIV drugs have turned the once-lethal infection into a chronic condition, cardiovascular disease has emerged as the leading cause of death in these individuals.

COVID-19 and microbiota increase disease severity in obesity and diabetes

The combined effects of the body's microbiota working together with COVID-19 in the lungs could explain the severity of the disease in people with obesity and diabetes, according to a paper, 'Obesity and diabetes as comorbidities for COVID-19: Underlying mechanisms and the role of viral–bacterial interactions', published in eLife,

Enrolment begins in ReShapeCare - a reimbursable, evidence-based virtual weight management programme

ReShape Lifesciences has announced that the first 25 healthcare providers have partnered with ReShapeCare since the programme's launch in June of this year, allowing referrals of their patients to the reimbursable, virtual weight-management programme. Patients within the programme include individuals currently receiving treatment, those who may have lost continuity of care, patients pursuing bariatric surgery and those involved in a medically supervised weight-loss programme.

Ethicon launches Echelon Endopath Staple Line Reinforcement buttress solution

Ethicon has launched the of Echelon Endopath Staple Line Reinforcement (SLR), a novel buttressing device designed to further strengthen staple lines and reduce potential complications during bariatric, thoracic and general surgical procedures, in the US. This is the company’s first buttress solution designed for use with its own industry-leading Echelon Flex Powered Staplers with GST reloads, which have been associated with a lower rate of air leaks and bleeding complications1,2. 

Increased risk of adverse outcomes for COVID-19 patients with sleep apnoea

People who have been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnoea could be at increased risk of adverse outcomes from COVID-19, according to a study from the University of Warwick. The conclusion is drawn from a systematic review of studies that reported outcomes for COVID-19 patients that were also diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnoea.

Microbes in the gut may influence metabolism

A study in mice has found that the estimated ten trillion bacteria living in your digestive system may shape your metabolism, as well as directly influencing biological processes from bowel movements to behaviour. Researchers in Daniel Mucida's Laboratory of Mucosal Immunology at Rockefeller University, have identified a particular type of gut neuron that controls blood sugar levels, influencing appetite.

GI Windows raises US$16.4 million for Incision-less Anastomosis System

GI Windows Medical, a clinical-stage, privately-held medical device company, has raised US$16.4 million Series A-1 financing. The financing attracted Johnson & Johnson Innovation along with Sonder Capital, GT Healthcare, JC Investco and one additional strategic investor. In addition to the institutional financing, GI Windows also received investments from existing shareholders as well as new investors, the Kennedy Trust and Coleman Trust.

COVID-19 increases binge-eating and emotional distress in young adults who had experienced weight stigma

Young adults who have experienced weight stigma have more distress and maladaptive eating behaviours during the pandemic, regardless of their body size. Research from the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and the University of Minnesota shows that young adults who experienced weight stigma before the pandemic have higher levels of depressive symptoms, stress, eating as a coping strategy, and are more likely to binge-eat during COVID-19, compared to those who have not experienced weight stigma.