Journal watch - review of the latest clinical papers 25/08/2021

Welcome to our weekly round-up of the latest bariatric and obesity-related papers published in the medical literature. As ever, we have looked far and wide to give you an overview of paper including a Position Statement from the ASMBS on postoperative nausea and vomiting in bariatric surgery, a review on the endoscopic management of sleeve stenosis, why measuring β-cell function does not add predictive value to defined clinical models of diabetes remission one year after surgical weight loss, why MicroRNAs may be important regulators of risk for type 2 diabetes and the importance of gender in obesity research and interventions (please note, log-in maybe required to access the full paper).

Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Bariatric Surgery - A Position Statement endorsed by the ASMBS and the ISPCOP


Published in SOARD, the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and the International Society for the Perioperative Care of the Obese Patient have endorsed a Position Statement on Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting (PONV) in Bariatric Surgery. The paper notes that PONV can affect up to 40% of the surgical population.


Moreover, compared to the general surgical population, patients undergoing bariatric surgical procedures experience a much higher incidence of PONV and current enhanced recovery after bariatric surgery (ERABS) guidelines suggest intraoperative prophylaxis but provide little guidance for postoperatively administered prophylaxis or treatment.


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Preintervention Clinical Determinants and Measured β-Cell Function As Predictors of Type 2 Diabetes Remission After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery

Writing in Diabetes Care, researchers from New York, assessed whether the addition of measured preoperative β-cell function would improve established clinical models of prediction of diabetes remission.


They assessed pre-surgery clinical characteristics, metabolic markers, and β-cell function after oral and intravenous glucose challenges in 73 individuals with severe obesity and type 2 diabetes and again one year after gastric bypass surgery.


They concluded that the addition of measured β-cell function does not add predictive value to defined clinical models of diabetes remission one year after surgical weight loss.


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Endoscopic Management of Sleeve Stenosis

Researchers from Israel report their experience with endoscopic management of sleeve stenosis at a tertiary bariatric centre. Published in Obesity Surgery, they examined the outcomes of 67 patients who underwent 130 endoscopic dilations.


They reported that the success rate of endoscopic dilatation was 76.1%, however 16 patients underwent conversion to gastric bypass. During endoscopic management, there was a 1.5% risk of sleeve perforation requiring emergency surgery and they noted that mild weight regain occurred following endoscopic sleeve dilation.


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Circulating MicroRNAs predict glycemic improvement and response to a behavioral intervention

Researchers from the University of California and New York University assessed whether circulating microRNAs predicted improvements in fasting blood glucose, a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, over 12 months.


Writing in Biomarker Research, the study measured circulating microRNAs in 82 patients with prediabetes using a flow cytometry miRNA assay. They found that subsets of microRNAs were significant predictors of final fasting blood glucose after 12-months and changes in fasting blood glucose over 12-months.


This is one of the first papers to use a longitudinal design to assess whether microRNAs predict changes in fasting blood glucose over time and they added that further exploration of the function of the microRNAs may provide new insights about the complex aetiology of type 2 diabetes and responses to behavioural risk reduction interventions.


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Does Weight-Cycling Influence Illness Beliefs in Obesity? A Gender-Sensitive Approach

Investigators from the University of Bamberg, Germany, utilised a Common-Sense-Model (CSM) to examine the extent that illness representations in obesity are shaped by experiences of weight-cycling and the extent that gender influences their quality.


Featured in the Journal of Obesity, they found that the representations of timeline and consequences as well as the emotional representation are particularly influenced by weight-cycling, especially in men. Women showed more maladaptive illness representations than men. the researchers claim that the findings not only emphasise the importance of gender in obesity research and interventions.


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